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Author:
Hotelschool
Publication number:
2018

Hotelschool privacy statement

The effect of effort expenditure and work-home arrangements on negative home interference in the hospitality industry.
Author:
Tromp, D.M, & Blomme, R.J
Publication number:
2012

International Journal of Hospitality Management, 31(4), 1213-1221.

 

This study investigates the role of job expenditure and job control on negative work-home interference according the Effort-Recovery model. In addition, the role of work-home arrangements, as a measure of home control, is investigated. This study concerns higher educated employees who have been graduated from a business university. Working overtime, work-home arrangements and autonomy were significantly related to negative work-home interference giving proof to the  Effort-Recovery model. Especially employees who work in the hospitality industry indicated significantly more working overtime and less being positive about the work-home arrangements while these were the most important predictors of

negative work-home interference. The results give directions to what HRM policies organizations should pay attention to, to minimize negative work-home interference and its negative consequences among their employees.

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02784319/31

Consumer response to Healthy Choice® nutrition information menu labeling in full service restaurants: Making the healthy choice.
Author:
Gallicano, R., Van Rheede, A., & Blomme, R.J.
Publication number:
2012

In J. Chen (Ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, Vol. 8 (pp. 109-127). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited (UK).

 

Previous research has concluded that there is consumer desire for nutrition information to be provided on restaurant menu items and restaurant customers presented with this information will make healthier menu choices (Mills & Thomas, 2008). Limited research has been performed in a restaurant setting measuring real rather than intended behavior. The purpose of this research experiment is to measure consumer response, in a full-service restaurant setting, to nutrition information on menu items and subsequently determine if consumers will use this information in their menu item choice. An experiment was conducted with 264 restaurant customers at a full-service a la carte restaurant. Customers chose from menu items labeled with or without a Healthy Choices label. A logistic regression model was used to predict whether people would choose Healthy Choice menu items. Fifty-four percent of restaurant customers chose the healthy choice menu item. The logistic regression confirms that those people who desire nutrition information also use this information in their menu choice. The study concludes with recommendations for the industry on directing consumer menu choice toward healthier items.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S1745-3542(2012)0000008010

 

A resource-advantage perspective on pricing: shifting the focus from ends to means-end in pricing research.
Author:
Jean-Pierre van der Rest & Angela Roper
Publication number:
2013

Journal of Strategic Marketing, DOI:10.1080/0965254X.2013.804856

 

This paper contributes to a long-lasting debate between practitioners who argue that academia is unable to understand what pricing is all about and academics who criticize practitioner pricing approaches for lacking rigor or rationality. The paper conceptualizes a resource-advantage (R-A) perspective on pricing by drawing on the R-A theory of competition. After a review of R-A theory, the paper integrates the price discretion concept and pricing as a spanning competence by introducing a separation between resources that create and resources that extract value, thereby expanding R-A theory to pricing. The perspective aims to shed light on how the process of competition helps organizations to learn/benefit from pricing capabilities. The research shifts the focus of pricing research from an equilibrium-based static view to a dynamic, disequilibrium-provoking pricing competence. In this way, it draws attention to what is perhaps most relevant to pricing in practice: the actual means necessary to determine price.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0965254X.2013.804856

A research framework on sustainability: Practices in the hospitality industry.
Author:
Van Rheede, A., & Blomme, R.J.
Publication number:
2012

Journal: In J. Chen (Ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, Vol. 8 (pp. 257-271).

 

The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental

sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with financial benefits in the operation of the hoteliers. Practices connected to the social aspect of sustainability are less developed. The dominant utilitarian paradigm in managers’ decisions is a strong causal factor in the lack of systematic social activities. The economic driver seems to be too strong! The suggested research agenda will enable us to better explain this phenomenon in which companies include sustainable development in their strategy – as long as the benefits are visible. In this agenda a broad definition of sustainability is needed and more attention should be paid to the different stakeholders. Next to this stakeholder perspective also additional approaches such as change management are necessary. In line with this multiple-perspective approach both qualitative and quantitative methods to research the practices in and the motives for a more sustainable hospitality industry, are needed. Finally to understand motives and actual behavior of employee and guest toward sustainable alternatives, more experiment research designs are needed.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1745-3542&volume=8

Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations.
Author:
Wiegerink, K., J. Huizing, R. Rotermund
Publication number:
2012

Stickdorn & Frischhut (Eds.): Service Design and Tourism, Norderstedt: Books on Demand GmbH.

 

The field of design has changed completely during the past. Previously, design was seen as a profession that operates in specialist areas such as graphic design, product design, and fashion design; during the last 10 years it changed its scope from ‘Design Centred Design’ to ‘User Centred Design’. As such, and building on the service-dominant logic and services marketing, service design goes beyond designing artefacts and is argued to be no longer limited to the design of tangible products only, but also designs complex and interactive service processes and ecosystems. These developments lead to the emergence of ‘service design’, a multidisciplinary and systematic approach, which can cope with the functionality and complexity of services by visualizing their systems and processes as well as by placing the client at the heart of the process.

 

 

http://issuu.com/marcstickdorn/docs/sdt

Student perceptions of information system subject learning in hospitality management degree programmes: A study of contexts for “deep learning”.
Author:
Murphy, H.C. and De Jongh, H.
Publication number:
2011

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 23(3), 393-409.

 

Purpose – This paper aims to investigate whether students adopt a “deep” approach to learning, i.e. “seeking meaning”, in the context of the subject of information systems (IS) and hospitality management degree programmes.

Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire that covers the key constructs, i.e. teaching, feedback, assessment, student autonomy and deep learning, is administered to two samples of final year students. Statistical tests indicate the significant differences between the two samples and the relationship between students' perception of their learning environment and “deep” learning in IS.

 

Findings – Results show that, even though there are some significant differences between the two groups, particularly in items of teaching methods, feedback and assessment, “deep learning” is acquired in both contexts.

 

Research limitations/implications – This research is limited to a comparative study of two institutions and further research is recommended to discover constructs and contexts particular to the hospitality sector.

 

Practical implications – These results reveal that “constructive alignment” of teaching and learning priorities is needed with resource and training implications for both teachers and educational establishments.

 

Originality/value – This research investigates information systems subject learning in hospitality management programmes (and the need to see an information system as an integrated, social system). It examines “contexts” as part of the learning environments: this is new. It also marries two different learning measurements (those of ETL and Cope) to quantitatively examine the phenomenon of “deep learning” in the hospitality IS subject context.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1918020

Exploring Success Factors in Top Careers in the Netherlands'.
Author:
Sok, J.M.H., Blomme, R.J., Tromp, D.M. and Van Muijen, J.J.
Publication number:
2011

in Chen, J.S. (ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, 7, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 3-27.

 

The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who are currently working in a high management position in the hospitality industry, about their experiences on their way to the top. For the purpose of comparison we later on decided to apply theoretical sampling and include women from other industries, and subsequently men from inside and outside the hospitality industry. Grounded Theory analysis revealed six factors that influenced all their rising careers: internal drive, ambition, social skills, competencies, personality, and external factors. Although the factors were of varying importance at different stages of their professional life cycle, “internal drive” and “ambition” were found to be most important throughout the progressing careers. Some differences between the groups studied are described and implications for future research and practice are discussed.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1745-3542&volume=7

Work-family conflict as a cause for turnover intentions in the hospitality industry.
Author:
Blomme, R.J., Van Rheede, A. and Tromp, D.M.
Publication number:
2010

Tourism & Hospitality Research, 10(4), 269-285.

 

This study examines the work-family conflict approach to the turnover intentions of highly educated employees within the hospitality industry. The purpose was to investigate the relation between workplace fl exibility, organizational support, work-family conflict and the intention to leave among highly educated male and female employees working in the hospitality industry. The research study conducted among this specific group worldwide provided a corpus of 247 respondents. The results show that work-family conflict and organizational support can explain a substantial amount of variance among highly educated employees regarding their intention to leave an organization.

 

This study also found that for men work-family conflict could be explained by lack of organizational support, while for women work-family conflict could be explained both by dissatisfaction with workplace fl exibility and lack of organizational support. In addition, with regard to women, the study has shown that organizational support has a moderating effect on the relation between workplace fl exibility and work family conflict. This study suggests that maintaining a good organizational climate and offering the possibility of fl exible work hours to improve the balance between workand family are important factors when it comes to retaining highly educated staff.

 

http://thr.sagepub.com/content/10/4/269.full.pdf

The use of the psychological contract to explain turnover intentions in the hospitality industry: a research study on the impact of gender on the turnover intentions of highly educated employees.
Author:
Blomme, R.J., Van Rheede, A. and Tromp, D.M.
Publication number:
2010

International Journal of Human Resource Management, 21(1), 144-162.

 

The subject of this study is the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship within the hospitality industry with special reference to highly educated employees. The purpose was to research the differences in the psychological contract and its relation to the intention to leave between highly-educated male and female employees. The research study conducted among this specific group worldwide provided a corpus of 247 respondents. The results show that psychological contract measures, and in particular job content, can explain why there is a substantial amount of variance among highly-educated employees regarding their intention to leave an organization, especially if the mediating role of affective commitment is taken into account. Moreover, it would appear that for women in particular, promotion opportunities and work-family balance were related to turnover intentions while for men the clarity of the job description was an important predictor for leaving. We suggest that the results of this study should be considered when developing gender-specific HRM policies to retain highly-educated staff. Considering the limitations of this study, we suggest that it be followed by research studies which concentrate on the job aspects which may be related to employee turnover. A longitudinal study concentrating on the relation between the psychological contract, turnover intentions and actual turnover behaviour should also be carried out.

 

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/bibliographic_databases.htm?id=1857620&PHPSESSID=fbt2krvlgl8c3m85b03uf4sgi1

The relationships between psychological strain, organizational support, affective commitment and turnover intentions of highly educated hospitality.
Author:
Tromp, D.M., Van Rheede, A. and Blomme, R.J.
Publication number:
2010

in Chen, J.S. (ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, 6, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 117-134.

 

Turnover of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry is growing rapidly. A predictor of turnover in the hospitality industry recently put forward, but not yet fully researched, is psychological strain. This chapter investigates the role of psychological strain and organizational support in relation to affective commitment and turnover intentions. The results show that both psychological strain and organizational support were found to be significant predictors of turnover intentions. The effect of organizational support was partly mediated by psychological strain and fully by affective commitment. No significant interaction effects with gender were found. As organizational support is a precursor of both psychological strain and intention to leave and is in the scope of influence of a hospitality company, it could be a starting point for reducing turnover.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1745-3542&volume=6

 

Eventmarketing.
Author:
Wiegerink, K. and Peelen, E.
Publication number:
2010

Publisher: Amsterdam: Pearson Education.

 

Het boek benadert eventmarketing vanuit de marketing. Hoe kunnen events bijdragen aan de realisatie van de marketingstrategie, op deel terreinen als het propositie-, het merken-, het relatie- en het verkoopbeleid en het klantgericht maken van organisaties. De auteurs positioneren eventmarketing en live communicatie als integraal onderdeel van de cross channel communicatie, daarnaast besteden ze aandacht aan het belevingsproces voor, tijdens en na de events en zoomen zo in op de kern van events.
Ook schetsen ze het brede veld van eventmanagement en –organisatie, zonder al te diep in te gaan op de operationele uitwerking. Ten slotte staan ze uitgebreid stil bij het onderwerp van de accountability: het vraagstuk van het aantoonbaar maken dat eventmarketing activiteiten per saldo profijtelijk zijn.

 

 

http://www.pearsoneducation.nl/product.asp?isbn=9789043025829&cat=highD

 

The hospitality industry: an attractive employer? An exploration of students' and industry workers' perceptions of hospitality as a career field.
Author:
Blomme, R.J., Van Rheede, A. and Tromp, D.M.
Publication number:
2009

Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education, 21(2), 6-14.

 

One of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly-educated and highly-skilled employees. In this research study the hospitality industry refers to a broad variety of service industries including hotels, food service, casinos, and tourism. Dutch research studies suggest that management-level turnover is growing rapidly (Reijnders, 2003; Blomme, 2006). One research study amongst graduates of the Hotelschool The Hague (Blomme, 2006) has shown that within 6 years after graduation about 70% of all graduates leave the hospitality industry. Research studies conducted on a wider scale in a large number of hospitality organizations in the Netherlands seem to confirm this tendency (Reijnders, 2003). From an international perspective, different researchers (Walsh & Taylor, 2007; Hoque, 1999a; Hoque, 1999b) suggest that retaining highly-educated staff is becoming a primary challenge for the hospitality industry.

Perceptions of job and hospitality industry characteristics on career decisions.
Author:
Van Rheede, A., Tromp, D.M. and Blomme, R.J.
Publication number:
2009

in Chen, J.S. (ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, 5, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 51-68.

 

This paper reports on the initial results of a case study on management-level turnover in the hospitality industry and on factors influencing the career decisions of highly educated employees to stay or leave the industry. This issue is considered using an interpretative paradigm and the conclusion drawn is that retaining these employees cannot be ensured by HRM policy alone. Both personal and general career factors are important, strongly influenced by social aspects. Furthermore, perceptions (deserved or undeserved) of the actual job, as well as characteristics of the industry, are important when deciding to pursue a career either within or outside the hospitality industry.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1745-3542&volume=5

In Chen, J.S. (ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, 5, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 51-68. This paper reports on the initial results of a case study on management-level turnover in the hospitality industry and on factors influencing the career
Author:
Blomme, R.J., Tromp, D.M. and Van Rheede, A.
Publication number:
2008

in Chen, J.S. (ed.) Advances in Hospitality and Leisure, 4, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 3-28

 

As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship had not been investigated with regard to the hospitality industry, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular job content, can explain why there is a substantial amount of variance in intention among highly educated hotel employees with regard to leaving the organization, especially when the mediating role of affective commitment is taken into account. In this paper, managerial implications are discussed, and recommendations for further research are made.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=1745-3542&volume=4

Optimal imperfect pricing decision-making: Modifying and applying Nash's rule in a service sector context.
Author:
Van der Rest, J.I. and Harris, P.J
Publication number:
2008

International Journal of Hospitality Management, 27(2), 170-178.

 

This paper aims to demonstrate how a simple rule of thumb can form a basis to offer a rational and consistent approach to pricing decision-making when faced with (partially) unknown demand and cost functions. To this purpose Nash’s decision rule (1975) is reevaluated, modified, and applied in a service product context. The decision rule can provide management with a powerful indicator of the direction in which profit will change as the result of a change in price. It specifies the conditions under which differential pricing or discounting may be (more) profitable. In this way, the rule provides a basis for a more competitive business pricing policy. The modification to Nash’s rule demonstrates that pricing can benefit from quantitative techniques which are comparatively straightforward to understand and apply. It reduces uncertainty by specifying the required elasticity of demand necessary to make change in price

worthwhile. With this rule, managers have an additional tool to evaluate potential price changes in the context of particular market circumstances. The paper concludes by explaining how Nash’s applied and modified rule provides an original and rational methodology for exploring whether discounting is a suitable pricing strategy for service businesses with high variable costs and inelastic demand patterns.

 

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02784319/27/2